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Posts Tagged ‘Schools’

Plan now for Walk to School Day, Oct. 7

Sunday, August 9th, 2009

www.pedbikeimages.org/Katy Jones

www.pedbikeimages.org/Katy Jones

It’s not too early to begin planning how your school & community will celebrate Walk to School Day on October 7, 2009!  The Health by Design Walk & Bike to School Workgroup has prepared a letter and information sheet to help you spread the word, organize an event, and to work toward making every day good for walking and biking to school!  We hope you will join in the fun and share your event pictures and stories with us.  Don’t hesitate to let us know how we can assist with resources and support for your effort. 

AAP Policy Statement on the Built Environment

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009

In case you didn’t see it earlier this month, the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Environmental Health released a policy statement: The Built Environment: Designing Communities to Promote Physical Activity in Children.  The article, published in the June issue of Pediatrics,  includes recommendations for pediatricians and government. 

Abstract: An estimated 32% of American children are overweight, and physical inactivity contributes to this high prevalence of overweight. This policy statement highlights how the built environment of a community affects children’s opportunities for physical activity. Neighborhoods and communities can provide opportunities for recreational physical activity with parks and open spaces, and policies must support this capacity. Children can engage in physical activity as a part of their daily lives, such as on their travel to school. Factors such as school location have played a significant role in the decreased rates of walking to school, and changes in policy may help to increase the number of children who are able to walk to school. Environment modification that addresses risks associated with automobile traffic is likely to be conducive to more walking and biking among children. Actions that reduce parental perception and fear of crime may promote outdoor physical activity. Policies that promote more active lifestyles among children and adolescents will enable them to achieve the recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity. By working with community partners, pediatricians can participate in establishing communities designed for activity and health.